GAME REVIEW: Raptors vs Pistons [Nov 5]

In general, there are three strata of teams in the NBA each year:

High End – with a plus .549 [+] Win %
Middle – with a .450-.550 [0] Win %
Low End – with a minus .450 [-] Win %

When your team plays a game against a High End team, if all other numbers are relatively equal, your squad is going to come up short on the scoreboard, more often than not, if you lose the Battle of the Boards [i.e. the Rebounding Differential].

Asserting the Collective Will of your team over an opponent, in a specific game, is done most effectively by physically dominating them on the boards, i.e. when possession of the ball is actually up for grabs … as it is on ALL missed shot attempts … saying, in effect, to your individual & collective check,

“Uhn, ahh … that Rebound, right there, is mine, NOT yours; regardless what you might ‘think’; because I am stronger, better, tougher, smarter, etc., than you are … and there’s nothing you can do about it.”

At some point in the development of your team, if you are ever going to become a Legitimate Contender [i.e. a special sub-group within the High End category] for the NBA championship, you will NEED to consistently outperform THE OTHER HIGH END TEAMS IN THE NBA … not just the Middle-of-the-Pack and/or the Low End ones … in this decisive area of the game.

If not, your team is simply a Pretender, with no authentic chance of ever capturing the Larry O’Brien Trophy, regardless of what your GM, head coach, players, certain other NBA observers, and fans might think or say.

It’s a cold, harsh world, in the NBA.

“No Rebounds; No Rings.”Pat Riley

——————————————————–

FINAL SCORE: TORONTO 93, Detroit 100
Game Info

POSITIVES

 

Pos

mp

fgm-a

3fgm-a

ftm-a

+/-

OR

dr

tot

ast

pf

st

to

bs

ba

pts

ker

C.Bosh

F

44:34

11-24

0-2

4-5

-6

4

9

13

1

2

1

2

0

1

26

+23

J.Calderon

G

35:40

7-12

1-3

9-9

-3

0

4

4

8

1

0

1

0

1

24

+29

* 3FGM-A [%] vs Opp: TOR 6-15 [40.0], Det 3-12 [25.0]; TOR +9 Pts 

NEEDED AREAS OF IMPROVEMENT

 

Pos

mp

fgm-a

3fgm-a

ftm-a

+/-

OR

dr

tot

ast

pf

st

to

bs

ba

pts

ker

J.O’Neal

C

28:59

3-10

0-0

2-3

+3

0

3

3

0

3

0

3

1

0

8

-2

* Rebounding Differential: TOR 38, Det 43; TOR -5
* Assist:Turnover Differential vs Opponent: TOR +4 [15:11], Det +16 [21:5]; TOR -12  

KEY POSSESSION OUTCOME[S]

* Throughout the 2nd Q … when the Pistons turned a 3 point deficit [TOR 23, Det] into an 8 point lead, largely by abusing Andrea Bargnani [15 pts relinquished, in total, 9 of which were to Tayshaun Prince] and Jason Kapono [5 pts relinquished] defensively, both, in the half-court and in transition situations. 

* Throughout the 4th Q … when the Raptors gave up 3 crucial Offensive Rebounds which the Pistons cashed in for 7 points.

———————————–

Sam Mitchell Post-game Interview

[Hint – When you look at the videotape, Sam, you should be able to see for yourself that: I. Removing Joey Graham from the rotation last night, early in the 2nd quarter, and matching-up exclusively with Anthony Parker, Jason Kapono and Jamario Moon against the Pistons superior Wings [i.e. Prince, Rip, Afflalo & Herrmann] cost your team dearly (i) on the boards, (ii) in defensive transition, and (iii) in 1-on-1 defensive assignments, including isolations; and, that II. The major Defensive & Rebounding liabilities last night were (a) Il Mago, (b) J-Killa and, then, (c) Jamario Moon, at the #3-spot.]

———————————–

As has been suggested in this space before …

1. Acquiring Jermaine O’Neal at the expense of losing Rasho Nesterovic [their 2nd best rebounder last year] … plus, the No. 17 [overall] Draft Pick [2008], plus Carlos Delfino, plus Jorge Garbajosa … is NOT going to effectively address the Raptors’ on-going deficiency in Rebounding Differential; and,

2. Unless this organization takes the steps of (i) using Kris Humphries for more minutes per game, and (ii) re-configuring the primary roles of Jamario Moon [to the #2-spot, from #3 or #4] & Joey Graham [who should be getting more burn at the #3-spot … because a player like Tayshaun Prince is NOT physically capable of isolating against him by using multiple dribbles],

the Raptors are going to struggle mightily in their games this year against the High End teams in the NBA.

———————————–

As currently constituted, the Detroit Pistons are a Legitimate Contender to win the NBA title this season; the Toronto Raptors are not.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

6 Responses to “GAME REVIEW: Raptors vs Pistons [Nov 5]”

  1. FLUXLAND Says:

    Khandor, I simply do not understand how you can justify J.G. deserving more time, based on his performances thus far, during his NBA career.

    The miss handled rebound turned turnover, while no one near in sight, would be enough for me to lose my mind while asking myself how is this player even in the NBA?

    Unless you have seen him playing under a different set of circumstances, with substantially different results, I don’t get what convinces you that this is someone whom a high degree of success if to be expected from, in the NBA.

  2. khandor Says:

    Flux,

    You of all people should know that what I do and what I say … contrary to what some highly delusional Raptors fans might think … involves no B.S. whatsoever.

    Because it’s you who’s asking me, it’s a pleasure for me to elaborate further so that my unique interpretation of Joey Graham’s performance in yesterday game, for example, can be made easier for others to understand.

    ————————————————————————-

    Have you watched your taped version of yesterday’s game 2 or 3 or more times?

    Because I have.

    Have you charted the outcome of each and every ‘Possession Outcome’, for both teams, during that 2nd Quarter when the Pistons built their half-time lead to 8 pts [54-46] after being down by 3 pts [20-23] at the end of the first 12 minutes?

    Because I have.

    Have you then assigned responsibility to a specific Raptor for each of the 34 pts the Pistons scored in that 2nd quarter, accurately, based on who was covering whom, whose job it was to help off whom, whose job it was to help the helper, or to switch, or to complete a secondary rotation, or to pick up a specific opponent in defensive transition who might be different from their assigned check in a regular half-court situation, or whose job it was to box-out a specific opponent, either in a half-court or a defensive transition situation, etc., etc., etc., …?

    Because I have.

    And I have those detailed numbers in front of my two eyes, right now, as I’m typing this reply to your specific inquiry.

    When I tell you [or others, either on-line or in real life] that it was Andrea Bargnani who killed the Raptors on defense in the 2nd quarter of last night’s game and then Jason Kapono and then Jamarion Moon [who is being played out of position with this team] and then Will Solomon and then Anthony Parker and then Jose Calderon and then, last of all, Joey Graham … I am not pulling stuff out of thin air, like so many other Raptors fans are, when they make ‘generalized observations’ about this team that have no basis in either fact or ‘Basketball Acumen’.

    In the 2nd quarter of last night’s game … the Pistons scored 34 pts, which a real life NBA coach, who actually knows what he’s doing, would have assigned responsibility to a specific Raptor thusly, IMO:

    Andrea Bargnani, 15 pts
    Jason Kapono, 5 pts
    Jamario Moon, 4 pts
    Will Solomon, 4 pts
    Anthony Parker, 2 pts
    Jose Calderon, 2 pts
    Joey Graham, 2 pts

    In that 2nd quarter … the Turnover of which you speak, incorrectly assigned to Joey Graham, was in fact not recorded as a Turnover, at all … as Mr. Graham never had possession to begin with, following the missed FTA by Detroit, and it went down on the official scoresheet as a Team Rebound gained by the Pistons.

    During his 05:14 on the floor Joey G. was properly credited with 0 Turnovers … 0-1/FGM-A, 2 D-Rebs, 2 Tot-Rebs, and 1 Block-shot Against [BA] … which makes him a +1, according to the ‘game stats’ I keep from time to time.

    re: the one ‘BA’ credited against Joey G.

    Please do not be persuaded by the shoddy commentating which occurs on Raptors’ games all too frequently, like last night … which droned on incessantly about,

    “How Joey shouldn’t have ‘hesitated’ when he had the ball passed to him in the lane, on the Right Block, turned to the hoop and had his layup attempt blocked by Jason Maxiell, cause if he didn’t then he would have been able to score”,

    which was pure nonsense to the ears of anyone who really knows something about the NBA game.

    If anything, it’s the complete opposite, as Joey turned to the basket and shot the ball too quickly for his own good, in that specific situation he found himself in, versus Mr. Maxiell, who was not the primary defender on the play but the off the ball helper who Joey failed to pick-up properly, visually, in his haste to score the ball … and, in the process, please the legion of Raptors fans who think he stinks but who really know very little about how the game is actually played at this level of competition.

    Did you happen to notice early in that quarter when Tayshaun Prince got the ball on the Right Wing, in a iso situation versus Joey Graham, and tried to ‘go’ against him 1-on-1 [via back-down dribbles, a spin into the lane or a cross-over], what the eventual outcome was?

    Beacuse I did … i.e. Tay Prince, who abused Jamario Moon [4 pts] and Andrea Bargnani [9 pts] to the tune of 13 pts allowed in the 2nd quarter alone could NOT ‘take’ Mr. Graham off the bounce and was forced to kick it out to Mr. Maxiell, at the Top Of The Key, who took and missed an 18 ft jumpshot versus Mr. Bosh [who had provided token help intially to Joey G. as TP tried to drive middle on him, and then recovered out to the FT Line, in order to check Mr. Maxiell].

    That was a 1st-class defensive possession for the Raptors.

    In sharp contrast to what the Raptors did last night against the Pistons deadly Wing combo of Tay Prince & Rip … which was play Moon vs Tay and AP vs Rip … what Sam Mitchell NEEDED to do was employ a Raptors defensive line-up that features Moon vs Rip [who is a much better check for Jamario to Rebound against] and Joey vs Mr. Prince [who is not physically strong enough to do major damage vs a stud like Joey G.].

    Do you know what 2 Defensive Rebounds in a span of 05:14 projects out to over the course of, let’s say, 20 minutes of game action vs an outfit like the Pistons?

    Do you know just how valuable it is to have a player on the court, on the offensive end of the floor, who will shoot but 1 shot, a lay-up at that, during a span of 05:41 in a game vs a quality opponent like the Pistons? … which, in turn, then creates more and better shot opportunities for High Level players like CB4, El Matador and, say, an energetic under-sized Postman like Kris Humphries [if he was to be used properly by this organization]?

    Let me tell you unequivically, right now … it’s exceptionally valuable … in the eyes of men like Joe Dumars, or Gregg Popovich, or Pat Riley, or Phil Jackson, or Jerry Krause, or Jerry West, or Red Auerbach, etc.

    There are tonnes of things on a basketball court which Joey G. NEEDS to improve upon, as he is by no means a high calibre NBA player … but those who would suggest that he is somehow a much worse/less serviceable NBA player than Jason Kapono is, or Anthony Parker is, or Jamario Moon is … simply have no idea what they’re talking about, when it comes to watching and evaluating accurately basketball talent in the NBA game.

    Based on how he played in those 5 minutes of last night’s game … Sam Mitchell made a coaching error when he decided not to give Joey Graham more burn in that game, versus Wing players like Prince, Rip, Afflalo & Walter Herrman.

    —————————————–

    The real culprit who cost the Raptors big-time in last night’s game vs the Pistons superior Wings was ANDREA BARGNANI … as, every time they could, Detroit did a terrific job of free-flowing straight into their #5 on #3 Pick & Roll Series, which the Raptors were ‘switching’ against all night long, and getting killed in, with the Prince vs Bargnani iso that was created each and every time, resulting in either a foul or a made FG.

    —————————————–

    Flux,

    When I say stuff on-line … you should know full well … I am not just ‘MAKING IT UP’ as I go along. 🙂

  3. FLUXLAND Says:

    Khandor,

    Oh, I knew, you wouldn’t just be saying it for the sake of saying it. I suppose my statements should have had a question mark after it or been posed in that way. But, essentially, I was asking what you were seeing, that I clearly am not. 🙂

    How did you know I taped the games? 🙂 I will admit I did watch it again only once, with little attention, not to mention my low bball acumen wouldn’t have allowed me to see all the things you did. But, I will do so in the AM and try to pick up on all the things you mentioned.

    Again, it seems you are attributing the teams failures to the coach. And I am not saying that is not the case, as many players have succeeded or failed under different coaches, I just have to learn to appropriately differentiate who’s properly “at fault” in a particular situation.

    re: JG – “turnover” has been explained, but it still doesn’t justify or explain, to me, his attempt to gain possession of a rebound with one hand, with his head turned in the opposite direction and already running, resulting in the loss of possible possession, regardless of how the loss of that opportunity was recorded. Surely, this MAY be enough for a coach to be frustrated or lose confidence in a player’s focus in the game, perhaps resulting in a benching, in order to prevent further episodes of the same incident occurring. I realize the opportunity cost here may be questioned, but it would come down to an individuals confidence in said player. Is a defensive stop/success worth it when it results in the other team gaining the offensive rebound or the other team gaining possession of the ball?

    This is, in part, the reservation I have with one Jose Calderon, who as effective as he is on offense, “fails” on the defensive end. I realize you may contend that it’s up to the coach to cover up his deficiencies, I just don’t know how effective that is and how high the rates of success with those tactics are.

    Thanks for the reply, much appreciated, and I would never assume you would just make stuff up! 😉

  4. khandor Says:

    Flux,

    Hopefully you know that the answer I wrote up there was not intended just for you to read, but for others as well who might decide to visit this thread … specifically, those delusional Raptors fans who are not as perceptive as you are when it comes to understanding, both, the ability of this team has and what you’ve read from me [here & elsewhere] about them.

    ———————-
    re: Again, it seems you are attributing the teams failures to the coach.
    ———————-

    This is not what I’m doing.

    Explaining accurately what happened in the game vs Detroit is not the same thing as ‘attributing the team’s failures to the coach’.

    Although it may be a subtle distinction to some … at no time did I say there that the reason the Raptors lost this game was because of Sam Mitchell.

    Would the team have played better in this game if Coach Mitchell had used his players differently? [as I suggested above]

    IMO, yes, they would have.

    However, the fact remains, the players who he did use had every opportunity to win the game, just as he described in his post-game interview.

    In the 2nd Quarter, each of Andrea Bargnani, Jason Kapono, Jamario Moon, Will Solomon, Anthony Parker, Jose Calderon and Joey Graham were responsible for relinquishing points to the Pistons, which turned around the momentum of this game; while some combination of the same group was responsible for allowing the 3 Offensive Rebounds Toronto gave up in the 4th quarter which resulted in 7 crucial ‘Second Chance Pts’ for Detroit and allowed them to close the door on the Raptors with the game on the line.

    ——————————————————–

    IMO …

    * Sam didn’t take Joey out of the game just because of that one misplayed Defensive Rebound; and,

    * Yes, a solid defensive stop in a 1-on-1 situation vs a multi-dimensional player like Tayshaun Prince is worth more than a single lost possession in the 2nd quarter of an NBA game.

    When NBA players are not used properly, according to their individual strengths & weaknesses it is not just the fault of that team’s head coach, although he must also share a sizable portion of the responsibility.

    In part, it’s a GM’s job to ensure that this is happening properly for his team, as well as the assistant coaches.

    ——————————————————–

    re: Calderon’s defense

    IMO, if you look closely at the tape you should see that Jose was able to adjust his individual defensive game in order to effectively limit the damage Rodney Stuckey was doing early on. Jose is a much better individual defensive player than others give him credit for … any time there is no ‘Big-on-Little’ pick involved in the action [which is something that gives every PG in the NBA trouble because of the size of the #5’s & #4’s in this League].

  5. Ryan Says:

    Moon and Parker as the starting 2 and 3 just won’t cut it.

    Bynum tore up Solomon in this game. I was dissapointed Ukic didn’t play.

    Team is still too finesse.

    Bosh will like playing in Detroit.

  6. khandor Says:

    Ryan,

    Against the very best teams in the NBA, I agree with you.

    Welcome aboard!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: